DAZED DIGITAL did a quick interview with “Here Comes the Neighborhood” Director/Creator Jenner Furst and Producer Ben Solomon.
They even switched it up and spelled it “Neighbourhood”
Spread Love its the London way !
The interview is below… read the full article by clicking on the picture or HERE 
Arts & Culture
Here Comes The Neigbourhood
  Published 3 minutes ago
This installment of Ben Solomon and Jenner Furst’s  doc series looks closer legendary graffiti photographer Martha Cooper

Dazed Digital: What’s the idea behind ‘Here Comes the Neighbourhood’?Jenner Furst:  The idea behind the project was to document and explore the power of  public art; to elevate the art and the artists themselves beyond the  beauty of their work, or the superficial aspects of their commissions,  into the roles of powerful change agents - uplifting downtrodden urban  districts, and inspiring a positive transformation for the people who  live there.
DD: How do you think public art helps communities?Ben Solomon:  The power of public art is that it’s right in front of you; it’s  unavoidable, and it is evidence of someone else’s existence, their  vision, and their determination to share that vision. So if you live on a  dim block with no colour and no visual stimulation, and then one day an  entire side of a building gets painted, you can’t choose to NOT see it.  Out of that the conversation begins, and where that goes is reliant on  the participants.
DD: What made you want to make a docu-series about the Wynwood Walls project in particular?Ben Solomon:  We have all been immersed in some form of the arts since we were  children, and have been involved collectively and separately in  different aspects of public art and graffiti over the years. With a  project like the Wynwood Walls, it’s co-opting what’s already in the  street and trying to harness it and focus it; what results it will yield  remains to be seen, but the concept, the process, and all of the  characters involved are captivating.
DD: What has the public reaction to the Wynwood Walls been like?Jenner Furst: The  politics of a community are complicated, and whenever a place  experiences a dramatic change like Wynwood, there are bound to be people  on the sidelines who have either been left out or haven’t received the  credit they feel is due. That being said, places have to change. If that  change can be driven by artists, but protect the heart and soul of a  neighbourhood without displacing its residents, then we can truly uplift  our cities.
DD: What future episodes have you got in the works?Jenner Furst: We have two great profiles in store, one on the artist Shie Moreno, who was one of the founding members of the multi-disciplinary arts collective Ink Heads, and another on Brandon Opalka,  an up-and-coming artist from the MSG graffiti crew. We also have the  season finale, which will bring the big ideas home and set the stage for  the future of the Wynwood area and Here Comes The Neighbourhood itself.
Text by Louisa McGillicuddy

DAZED DIGITAL did a quick interview with “Here Comes the Neighborhood” Director/Creator Jenner Furst and Producer Ben Solomon.

They even switched it up and spelled it “Neighbourhood”

Spread Love its the London way !

The interview is below… read the full article by clicking on the picture or HERE

Arts & Culture

Here Comes The Neigbourhood

  Published 3 minutes ago

This installment of Ben Solomon and Jenner Furst’s doc series looks closer legendary graffiti photographer Martha Cooper

Dazed Digital: What’s the idea behind ‘Here Comes the Neighbourhood’?
Jenner Furst
: The idea behind the project was to document and explore the power of public art; to elevate the art and the artists themselves beyond the beauty of their work, or the superficial aspects of their commissions, into the roles of powerful change agents - uplifting downtrodden urban districts, and inspiring a positive transformation for the people who live there.

DD: How do you think public art helps communities?
Ben Solomon
: The power of public art is that it’s right in front of you; it’s unavoidable, and it is evidence of someone else’s existence, their vision, and their determination to share that vision. So if you live on a dim block with no colour and no visual stimulation, and then one day an entire side of a building gets painted, you can’t choose to NOT see it. Out of that the conversation begins, and where that goes is reliant on the participants.

DD: What made you want to make a docu-series about the Wynwood Walls project in particular?
Ben Solomon
: We have all been immersed in some form of the arts since we were children, and have been involved collectively and separately in different aspects of public art and graffiti over the years. With a project like the Wynwood Walls, it’s co-opting what’s already in the street and trying to harness it and focus it; what results it will yield remains to be seen, but the concept, the process, and all of the characters involved are captivating.

DD: What has the public reaction to the Wynwood Walls been like?
Jenner Furst:
The politics of a community are complicated, and whenever a place experiences a dramatic change like Wynwood, there are bound to be people on the sidelines who have either been left out or haven’t received the credit they feel is due. That being said, places have to change. If that change can be driven by artists, but protect the heart and soul of a neighbourhood without displacing its residents, then we can truly uplift our cities.

DD: What future episodes have you got in the works?
Jenner Furst
: We have two great profiles in store, one on the artist Shie Moreno, who was one of the founding members of the multi-disciplinary arts collective Ink Heads, and another on Brandon Opalka, an up-and-coming artist from the MSG graffiti crew. We also have the season finale, which will bring the big ideas home and set the stage for the future of the Wynwood area and Here Comes The Neighbourhood itself.

Text by Louisa McGillicuddy

Legendary photographer Martha Cooper has been documenting graffiti and graffiti writers since the late 1970s. Her and Henry Chalfant’s book “Subway Art”, originally published in 1984, was largely responsible for the globalization of graffiti. She has remained a fixture in the community and culture, and has been documenting the Wynwood Walls since the project began in 2009. Her photos tell the story of the Wynwood Walls from its inception to expansion, and all of the artists and their respective works. In graffiti and street art, nothing is permanent, even commissioned walls. Because of the temporary nature of the medium, Martha’s photos outlast almost every piece of graffiti or street art itself.

Check out Martha’s blog on 12ozProphet 12ozprophet.com/index.php/martha_cooper/

This episode contains original music from Tommy Mas twitter.com/#!/TommyMasNYC

In this episode of Here Comes the Neighborhood, Kunle Martins aka EARSNOT, founder of the IRAK CREW, along with Jesse Geller aka NEMEL break down the importance of good penmanship, the difference between murals and graffiti, and the concept behind their “tagging mosaic” in Wynwood. Stealing, masturbation and other compulsive behaviors are also addressed.

For more information on Kunle Martins follow him at twitter.com/KunleIRAK

Jesse Geller, his dog and his girlfriend can be found at coastttocoast.tumblr.com/

This episode contains original music from Hanni El Khatib (“You Rascal You”) hannielkhatib.com/ as well as original music from Clams Casino (“bombing”) twitter.com/clammyclams

Liqen and Julia Willoughby Nason, Wynwood Walls, November 2011

Liqen and Julia Willoughby Nason, Wynwood Walls, November 2011

Martha Cooper and Ben Solomon at the opening of the Wynwood Walls group show, 2011

Martha Cooper and Ben Solomon at the opening of the Wynwood Walls group show, 2011

In this Episode of Here Comes the Neighborhood, Mexican artists Saner and Sego collaborate on a mural for the Wynwood Walls. They create a colorful dreamscape together, building on themes that each of the artists have explored for years. Saner’s interpretation of the work, and his poetic eloquence helps elevate the wall into an ethereal realm, while Sego, traveling to the United States for the first time, brings an astute attention to detail, and a stunning technique grounded in the complexities of the natural world. These Artists exemplify the power of art, both public and private, to function as a change agent, using this mural as a tool to reframe the worlds view of Mexico; from a dangerous narco state, to one of the most beautiful, mystical and transformative cultures in the world.

For more information on the artists featured in this episode visit their sites listed below.

Saner (saner.com.mx/)
Sego (segoyovbal.blogspot.com/)

This episode features music from Emile Haynie

For more info regarding the Wynwood Walls visit (thewynwoodwalls.com)

For more on the creative team behind this series visit (hctn.tv/learn-more/) or contact info@hctn.tv

Follow the series at vimeo.com/herecomestheneighborhood

Paint Provided By 33third Los Angeles, Mid City Arts and Montana Cans

In this Episode of Here Comes The Neighborhood, a cast of young up-and-coming international artists are in the spotlight for their contributions to the Wynwood Walls and the district at large. Curatorial Advisor Medvin Sobio of the Visual Arts Collective Viejas Del Mercado, 33third Los Angeles and Mid City Arts expresses the importance of a cultural exchange and building a platform for communication and reconciliation through Public Art. Art’s Manager Meghan Coleman explains the narratives behind the work from some of this year’s Artists, while Photographer Martha Cooper shares her unique perspective, having seen the graffiti and street art movement expand in the 1970’s from the New York City train yards to its state today as one of the largest art movements in the world.

Founder Tony Goldman expresses his privilege to welcome this year’s artists whom are traveling to the United States for the first time, including Alejandre Farto aka Vhils from Portugal, Neuzz, Sego and Saner from Mexico, Interesni Kazki from The Ukraine, b. from Greece and Liqen from Spain.

For more information on the artists featured in this episode visit their sites listed below.

Interesni Kazki (interesnikazki.blogspot.com/)
b. ( thisismybworld.com/)
Liqen (liqen.blogspot.com/)
Vhils ( alexandrefarto.com/ )
Neuzz ( neuzz.blogspot.com/)
Saner ( saner-dsr.blogspot.com/)
Sego (unurth.com/51615/Ovbal-Y-Sego-Mexico-City)

This episode features music from Kenny Beats (kennybeats.com/) and Tommy Mas